WGEA finds gender pay gap biggest in manager ranks

New data from the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA) shows that women in management ranks continue to get paid less than their male counterparts.

New data from the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA) shows that women in management ranks continue to get paid less than their male counterparts.

Based on full-time total remuneration, WGEA found that the largest gender pay gap occurs at key management personnel (KMP) level (28.9 per cent), followed by other executives/general managers (27.5 per cent), then other managers (24.6 per cent) and senior managers (23.5 per cent).

 

At KMP level, the largest gender pay gap is found in Administrative and Support Services, where the gender pay gap is 44.7 per cent, followed by Arts and Recreation Services where the gender pay gap is 35.1 per cent. Administrative and Support Services also has the largest gender pay gap at the ‘other manager’ level (23.1 per cent). Financial and Insurance Services has the largest gender pay gap for other executives/general managers (34.4 per cent), while Retail Trade has the largest gender pay gap for senior managers (28.7 per cent).

 

Director of the WGEA, Helen Conway, says this data reveals for the first time how the gender pay gap exists at every level of management across the Agency’s reporting population of over 11,000 employers.

 

“The data clearly shows women in management aren’t accessing the same earning opportunities as men,” Conway explains.

 

Pay inequity also persists below management ranks with pay gaps favouring men in every non-manager occupation. Even in female-dominated roles such as sales, community and personal service work, and clerical and administrative roles, there is a gender pay gap in favour of men.

 

What can employers do?
Employers that report to the WGEA can view their by-level pay gaps and how they compare to chosen comparison groups by downloading their confidential, organisation-specific benchmark reports from the WGEA online portal.

 

“Employers who are committed to creating equal access to opportunities for women and men need to work harder to remove barriers that inhibit women from entering these higher paying roles,” Conway says. “A lack of quality flexible work, the legacy of workplace cultures built on the male breadwinner model and gender bias are likely to be among the barriers that need to be tackled.”

 

WGEA has a suite of resources to help employers undertake a gender pay gap analysis. These are available at www.wgea.gov.au/lead/addressing-pay-equity. The Agency is also running a series of pay equity workshops in Sydney and Melbourne – more information on those can be found at www.wgea.gov.au/addressing-pay-equity/pay-equity-workshops.

 

Like My Business on Facebook now to get involved in the SME community discussion. 
Follow @mybusinessau on Twitter for breaking stories throughout the day. 
Learn more about the SME Association of Australia.

Are you aspirational? Find out about our stablemate, Aspire magazine.

 

promoted stories