Lack of sleep costing business millions in lost productivity

Australia’s largest-ever sleep census, conducted by bed manufacturer Sealy and CQUniversity, has revealed some alarming data on the economic impact of sleepless nights.



CAPTION: According to the Sealy Sleep Census, a whopping 38 per cent of employees admit to having fallen asleep at work or during a work meeting.

Australia’s largest-ever sleep census, conducted by bed manufacturer Sealy and CQUniversity, has revealed some alarming data on the economic impact of sleepless nights.

The Sealy Sleep Census polled 13,089 respondents from throughout Australia and found that 96 per cent of Aussies are waking up tired from their sleep each morning, with a mere four per cent saying they feel refreshed. The survey concluded that this is having a serious impact – a combined loss of millions of dollars in lost productivity every year – on the nation’s businesses, with sick days, lost man hours and reduced productivity rife.

According to the results of the census:

-       A third of Australians have called in sick to work due to lack of sleep;

-       70 per cent of Aussies admit their professional productivity is negatively impacted from feeling tired; and

-       At least 167,000,000 man hours are lost every year as a result, equating to almost $5 billion in lost productivity.

“The study gives us valuable insight not only into the sleeping habits of Australians but how sleep issues can impact directly on Australian commerce, with some alarming findings,” Sealy’s spokesperson Ross Gage says.

The census also found that there was a significant difference on the amount of sleep needed to function effectively when it came to occupation. Management executives felt they need less sleep to function effectively (compared to than those who don’t work, students, office workers, retail employees, parents, and the self-employed). Management executives also felt they needed less sleep to drive a car safely than most other occupations.

Perhaps the most alarming result from the Sealy Sleep Census is that 38 per cent of respondents said they have fallen asleep at work or during a work meeting.

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