New study highlights the power of employer brands in recruitment

Businesses need to differentiate between their consumer and employer brands and implement an effective employer brand strategy if they want to attract the right candidates and engage existing employees, according to new research from Hudson RPO.

Businesses need to differentiate between their consumer and employer brands and implement an effective employer brand strategy if they want to attract the right candidates and engage existing employees, according to new research from Hudson RPO. 

The report, titled How to Launch a Successful Employer Brand: Building on the Practices of Top Employer Brands, defines a strong employer brand as, ‘the perception of the organisation as a great place to work, by both current and potential employees’. According to the report’s findings, leading organisations devote significant resources to building an employer brand, with a strong focus on creating an employer brand strategy and a defined employee value proposition (EVP).

The report shows that compared to other brands, top employer brands dedicate an average budget of 70 per cent more on supporting employer brand initiatives, while twice as many top brands have a defined and documented strategy as compared to other brands. The global report also found that buy-in from senior company executives, multi-channel communication of a brand and internal promotion are all important components of building a successful employer brand. Businesses cannot rely on a strong consumer brand to recruit and engage employees, according to Suzanne Chadwick, Head of Employer Branding, Digital & Sourcing Innovation for Hudson RPO.

“While a strong consumer brand can help companies attract top talent to their organisation, a clearly defined employer brand will help ensure that those they hire will not only have the right skills, but also be a solid fit with the company’s culture and work environment – resulting in greater employee productivity, increased levels of engagement and higher rates of retention,” Chadwick said.

When it comes to building a successful employer brand, the report noted that certain building blocks are foundational to success, including authenticity, consistency with company practices and consistency with the consumer brand. The report also recommends developing a brand that is clear, believable, compelling and relevant.

“Unclear ownership of an employer brand results in ineffective collaboration and can even cause branding to become a ‘political’ issue,” Chadwick warned. “Clear ownership of an employer brand and collaboration from all corners of a business is essential."

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