Fat chance of a fat pay rise for Aussies next year, new research shows

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The number of workers turning to online platforms to earn extra income has doubled since January, study reveals. Australian workers expecting a pay rise next year may want to temper their expectations.
Airtasker’s second Future of Work study can reveal that more than 55 per cent of Australian workers expect a pay rise in the next 12 months - but fewer than half actually received one in the past year.

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The number of workers turning to online platforms to earn extra income has doubled since January, study reveals. Australian workers expecting a pay rise next year may want to temper their expectations.

Airtasker’s second Future of Work study can reveal that more than 55 per cent of Australian workers expect a pay rise in the next 12 months - but fewer than half actually received one in the past year.

The findings come after Productivity Commission chairman Peter Harris warned that growth in wages could slow to half the rate of the past 50 years.

At the same time, the number of Australians using online platforms such as Airtasker, UberX and AirBnB to earn extra money has doubled since January.

Airtasker’s second study of Australian employment focused on a number of issues including pay rises, hours worked, type of employment and desire to earn extra money outside of “9 to 5” jobs.

The study was based on a representative survey by Pureprofile of 1015 employed Australians across the country and expands on the findings of the first Future of Work study released in January. 

"As this study expands and broadens its scope, we find that it is exposing more pain points in the traditional ‘9 to 5’ style of work," said Airtasker co-founder and CEO Tim Fung.

"More and more workers are turning to sharing economy platforms to remedy diminishing hours, slower wage growth, or simply to take charge of their work-life balance and become their own boss.

"Specifically, this study shows that there is still a strong desire among Australians to earn extra money through traditional work channels.

"However, we've also unearthed a mismatch in expectations with pay rises that we expect to grow as technology continues to evolve the way we work".

The study revealed: 

•Pay rise expectations have outpaced the number of Australians who actually received a pay rise in the past 12 months, across all age groups. 

•The number of Australian workers using online platforms such as Airtasker, UberX and AirBnB to earn extra money has doubled since January.

•More workers say they are looking for a new job compared to January.

(Enable images on your email browser to see charts below)

•Few Australians work more than 40 hours per week.

•Most work between 30 to 40 hours. However, the majority of women surveyed indicated they worked less than 30 hours per week.

•Compared to the earlier Future of Work study, pay has overtaken flexibility in terms of the most important characteristic of work.

•Finally, the desire to earn extra income is high among all age groups. 


Additional findings:

•45% of respondents say they are likely or very likely to look for a new job in the next 12 months. This is up from 43.5% from the first Future of Work study in January. 

•83.4% strongly agree or moderately agree that: "The traditional employment model of the '9 to 5' office job is inflexible for workers in 2015 and into the future.” This is down from 84.8% in January. 

•79.9% strongly agree or moderately agree that: “The flexibility of freelancing / working for yourself makes up for the lack of certainty / predictability of work." This is up from 76.4% in January.

•8% of those surveyed said they are using online platforms such as Airtasker, Freelancer, 99Designs, UberX and AirBnB to earn extra money. This is up from 4% in January.

As part of this new work trend, Airtasker has seen substantial user growth, adding more than 100,000 users in the past six months. 

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Method: 

Airtasker's second Future of Work study was conducted by local research firm Pureprofile. It was measured via an online survey of a representative sample of 1015 Australians. 

Case studies:

John L.

St Kilda, VIC

John, 60, was a tradesman and a marine engineer before working for 20 years in the corporate sector for BMW. He is now semi-retired and getting back to his roots doing renovations, electrical work and various handyman jobs. "I've never lost my touch," he says. "I've renovated a lot of my own houses over the years." John says that Airtasker is flexible, transparent and fits in with his lifestyle. 

Tori K. 

Sydney, NSW

Tori, 20, used Airtasker to find work after she finished high school. She worked alongside another friend, who is also an Airtasker, before doing jobs on her own. Some of her favourite tasks include being paid to count advertisements before a movie - then watching the movie for free - and transporting a "huge" dog from Wollongong to Bondi.

Mekita F. and Joe S.

Glenroy, VIC

Mekito and Joe are married and like to work on jobs together. Joe says: "I work all day, she works on afternoons and we've got two little kids. Sometimes we barely see each other during the week. It allows us to go to different parts of Melbourne we've never been to. It's good for our relationship and each job is a learning experience."

 

 

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