Boost your growth by tapping into tourism boom

It’s never been a better time to attract tourists to your business, according to recent data, with short-stay arrivals to Australia reaching a record high – and they are spending more, too.

Australia is currently experiencing a tourism boom, according to Australian Bureau of Statistics figures analysed by property data firm CoreLogic RP Data.

In the last 12 months, the number of tourists staying in Australia for less than a week was 7,685,300 – a solid rise of 8.6 per cent on the previous year.

The top six countries from which these short-term arrivals originated were Japan, Singapore, the USA, the UK, China, and New Zealand.

While New Zealand had the largest volume of tourists, the average growth in New Zealand tourist numbers has declined, along with that of the UK. The numbers of tourists from Singapore, Japan and the USA are slowly increasing.

Growth in aggregate visitor numbers was boosted by a hefty rise in the number arriving from China, which soared by 23.7 per cent.

Other countries with rapidly growing numbers of citizens arriving on our shores are the Philippines (up 20.7 per cent), Poland (up 19.0 per cent), Vietnam (up 17.4 per cent), and Taiwan (up 17.1 per cent).

In addition to having the fastest growth in visitor numbers, Chinese tourists were also the highest spenders, forking out an average of $8,734 each. Despite economic troubles back home, Italians came in second with $7,163.

Leo Seaton, general manager media and communications at Tourism Australia, told My Business that Aussie firms should position themselves to capitalise on this tourism boom.

“With international visitors spending at record levels, the opportunities available for Australian tourism businesses at the moment are huge,” he said.

“The current focus of our international marketing activity is around food and wine, and Australia’s aquatic and coastal experiences.

“Those businesses which offer related and relevant tourism experiences can [enjoy] a real commercial advantage, which they should capitalise upon.”

To further maximise profits, businesses can tailor their consumer experience to appeal specifically to visitors from the top six countries.

“In the case of the Chinese market – our most valuable and second-largest by volume – that might include employing Mandarin-speaking staff, providing guides and signage in [Chinese languages], even making available Chinese newspapers and TV channels,” said Mr Seaton.

 

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