‘How I’m scaling my services business’

Scaling a services business isn’t the easiest of feats – but thankfully it’s not impossible, as one business owner’s experience demonstrates.

Physiotherapist and pilates instructor Becky Dyer, who operates Sydney-based practice BB Pilates + Physio, reached a point that's all too familiar for many services businesses. Her schedule was full and she had already taken on several instructors to help her out, but she wanted to grow the business further.

At the same time, Becky was worried that her patients – most of whom are pre- or post-natal women – were not having their full needs met, and were not accessing valuable preventative strategies.

It was then that she came upon a way to solve both these problems in one step: take the business online.Four different sized seedlings growing in pots

“Two years ago, I had a patient and she was a real go-getter, and she said ‘You know all your classes that you have, Becky, not everybody can't make those. Have you ever thought of doing something online for them, especially when you're a new mum and you can't leave the house, or you don't have the family to look after your kid to go to a class?’,” explains Becky.

“She said ‘Would you like to do something like that, an online thing?’. I said I'd love to do that, [so] we started Body Beyond Birth just a little over two years ago.

“It's an online business, a 12-week program, and it's pilates-based. It has special video tutorials that are physio advice as well. We have wholefood recipes on there and a dietitian to give nutritional advice.”

According to Becky, the online expansion has enabled her to reach many more patients and clients than her time or budget would ever have allowed otherwise.

“We started with the postnatal program, and then about a year ago we released the pregnancy program. Right now we're actually doing a trial with a major Sydney hospital to see if they would like to give it to all of their patients,” she says.

At the same time, Becky is also better able to cater for existing patients, by offering them a convenient and more cost-effective means of accessing additional help.

“We get a lot of bites [of the cherry] because I have people that are patients that end up taking classes, and then they want a little bit more than their one hour a week. They'll say ‘I'm going to do that online thing, too’,” says Becky.

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