Frost & Sullivan research underscores evolution of smartphones

A new report by Frost & Sullivan has confirmed that mobile devices have now transitioned from being primarily used for voice and text to more sophisticated multi-functional usage based on their mobile capabilities.

A new report by Frost & Sullivan has confirmed that mobile devices have now transitioned from being primarily used for voice and text to more sophisticated multi-functional usage based on their mobile capabilities.

Frost  & Sullivan’s Australian Mobile Device Usage Trends 2013 report estimates that Australia’s smartphone penetration in 2013 is at 73 per cent in the 15 to 65 age group, and predicts that number to reach 93 per cent by 2018. It’s predicted that in five years virtually all mobile phones will have built-in smartphone functionality. 

“As smartphone functionality continues to improve with higher resolutions and larger screens, faster internet access via 4G networks and higher data downloads, this percentage will increase significantly over the next few years,” Phil Harpur, Senior Research Manager, Australia & New Zealand, Frost & Sullivan said.

A testament to the evolution of technology, the voice function of smartphones is becoming less important to users as other options for communication become more accessible. Instant chat apps such as WhatsApp are expected to become more popular than SMS.

“Accessing social networking along with searching for jobs, houses to rent and cars to buy will continue to increase in popularity of the next few years,” Harpur predicted. “Booking travel and accommodation through mobile devices, laptops and PCs is gaining popularity, with nearly 60 per cent of consumers doing this at least once every six months.”

Not surprisingly, the report also found tablet penetration in Australian households is also forecast to increase significantly, from 49 per cent in 2013 to 80 per cent in 2018. 

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