Intel Security report examines tech trends for next decade

A newly released Intel Security reporton the future of technology suggests that there will be big winners and losers as collaborative technologies, robots and artificial intelligence transform the nature of work over the next decade.

A newly released Intel Security reporton the future of technology suggests that there will be big winners and losers as collaborative technologies, robots and artificial intelligence transform the nature of work over the next decade.

Intel Security’s first Safeguarding The Future Of Digital Australia In 2025 report examined the technology trends that may shape Australia’s future while also looking at Australian attitudes about identity, safety and security. The report was compiled by futurist Ross Dawson on behalf of Intel Security and launched to coincide with the start of Stay Smart Online Week.

 

With safety and security on their minds, the report found that only 32 per cent of Aussies feel safe and secure in an increasingly connected future, but also revealed that 49 per cent of us feel a general level of comfort about the rate of technological change. According to the report, by 2025 technology may have advanced to the point where it is implanted or connected to our physical selves. The report found that nearly half of Aussie employees would be interested in using technology such as virtual reality to avoid going into the office every day.

 

The report also includes a Newspoll survey on Australian attitudes about the role technology plays in their lives, as well as contributions from technology, security, privacy and parenting experts. Key trends identified by Newspoll include:

 

  • Our reputation, personal opportunities and identity will be shaped by our participation in social media.
  • There will be big winners and losers as collaborative technologies, robots and artificial intelligence transform the nature of work.
  • The brains of tomorrow’s adults may be networked to technology, transforming how they learn and interact.

 

“By seeking to understand how we’ll interact with technology over the next decade in our homes, at work, via online connections and how our young people will develop along side technology, we can better prepare for both the benefits and risks that closer connectivity will bring,” Keith Buckley, Managing Director for McAfee Australia and New Zealand, said.

 

“There is no doubt that technology is advancing and innovating, presenting opportunities and challenges for governments, businesses and consumers. However, Australians have a right to feel safe and secure about their connected future and trust that they have control over their digital information and privacy.”

 

According to the Safeguarding The Future Of Digital Australia In 2025 report, Australians are uncomfortable that their reputations and personal opportunities will be shaped by their participation in social media. 54 per cent said it would be unfair for financial credit ratings or job opportunities to be based on their online reputation.

 

“By 2025, there will be opportunities for increased sharing and connectedness in everything we do,’ said report author and futurist, Ross Dawson. “Our work environments and interactions will be more global thanks to virtual reality, and cognitive function for upcoming generations will evolve differently as they accommodate technology into their everyday activity.”

 

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