Are group buyers bored?

512x512-MyBus-Icon-V3_flattenGroup buying sites are sprouting at the rate of about three a week, but if the My Business office is a reasonable guide there are still some new customers to be had, some that are over the concept and others that are wising up to make the best of group deals.


That’s the sound that floated over a cubicle in the My Business office this week, followed by this:

“I just got ANOTHER email from Cudo.”

The staffer – a woman in her twenties - reckons she had just received her 5th email from the channel-nine-aligned site for the day.

Suddenly the office was buzzing with group buying experiences.

A member of our design team said he had signed up for a tooth-whitening deal and didn’t enjoy the experience.

“The service was offered very grudgingly,” he said. And the back-and-forth to the dentist to get molds made and then applied was a hassle.

A member of the print production team said she had let one group deal – a $15 high tea – lapse as she felt she could ‘take the hit’ at that price. But the $99 harbour cruise this grandmother has booked is firmly in her sights. She knows the day on which the deal expires and is finding time in her diary to use her coupon, but expects the cruise to be crowded with fellow late-activating group buyers.

Which brings us back to our twenty-something, who recently redeemed a restaurant deal just a day or two before her coupon was due to expire. She says the place was “packed” with other coupon-waving customers and felt just a little “stingy” cashing in her deal. She’s since booked a table at another restaurant where she plans to use a group buying coupon, and was asked a little grumpily if she intended to activate the deal when she dines.

Elsewhere around the office we found Gen-X colleagues whose response to an inquiry about their group buying experience was “Group what”?

Our Gen-Y staffers were typically confusing. One was unaware of group buying, another had spotted Cudo ads on Channel Nine but was unaware of the link between the two.

And your Editor? I’ve just signed up for a new variant on group buying that only asks for $2 up front and then asks you to pay the value of the deal at the merchant. I now possess a voucher entitling me to a $29 Indian meal for two people, complete with wine. It expires in December but, as Mrs Editor quickly noted, that the restaurant is located in an area noted for Italian food.

Ah well … it’s only two bucks!

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