90% of all mobiles will be smartphones by 2015

The market for smart phones is about to almost double and by 2015 more than 90% of all mobiles will be smart, a shift that will change the way you and your customers find information.

If you think mobile marketing and commerce are never going to amount to much, think again. Analyst outfit Telsyte has just published its Australian Smartphone Market Study 2011-2015 and predicts that by 2015 Australia will have 18.5 million smartphone users, up by nearly 10 million from today's smartphone user population.

Getting Australia to a smartphone population of 18.5 million will see a staggering 30 million units shifted between now and 2015.

Telsyte expects Apple’s iPhone "will continue to have installed market leadership until around 2014," at which point Android devices will take the lead. Telsyte " ... predicts Nokia to be a dark horse with its adoption of Windows Phone 7" and says Blackberry "will maintain a niche following with consumers." All manufacturers, the firm says, will be trying to lock in their customers by convincing them to stay on a single platform even when they upgrade handsets, in order to retain access to apps and content purchased with their handsets.

“The movement from a device mentality to a platform and application mentality in consumers is a game changer for the industry that was once just focused on moving boxes,” aid Telsyte Research Director, Foad Fadaghi.

Telsyte called out publishing as an industry likely to be strongly impacted by the increased adoption of smartphones, predicting in a press releases that "many online publishers in Australia will have a larger smartphone audience than the computer-based online audience by 2015. The inflection point will occur sometime during 2014 and could result in more traffic and revenue generated by smartphones than online, depending on the nature of their offerings."

That will mean lots more consumer attention focussed on smartphones, a trend that will require a change in thinking about advertising and marketing.

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