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Jobseekers reveal best ways to turn them off

Jobseekers reveal best ways to turn them off

Want to languish with unfilled key vacancies and have jobseekers avoid you like the plague? Then these are the best ways to go about it, a poll of 1,000 job hunters has revealed.

Australian managers overwhelmingly admit that finding skilled talent is a difficult challenge, but as specialist recruiter Robert Half discovered, there are definitive pet peeves among jobseekers that can see them abandon plans to approach a company.

And with 73 per cent of jobseekers stating they have received multiple job offers when looking for a new position, the difference between a smooth hiring process and an unpleasant one could be the deciding factor of whether a candidate accepts an offer.

Slow feedback on an application’s progress is the most niggling gripe among those hunting for their next job, with 53 per cent of jobseekers facing this frustration.

This was followed by delayed decision making and poor communication about the employer’s recruitment stages and process.

“With top skills in short supply, recruitment today is a seller’s market, and businesses cannot afford to alienate talent with long, drawn-out interview processes,” said David Jones, senior managing director at Robert Half Asia Pacific.

“A company’s recruitment process needs to be balanced against the expectations and frustrations of the jobseekers themselves. Companies could well benefit from reviewing and, if necessary, streamlining their application and interview process to ensure that delays and other frustrations are not costing them the best candidates.”

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Jobseekers are also highly critical of the multiple interview process used by some employers. With most generally applying to more than one organisation, a higher volume of interviews becomes more difficult to schedule and keep track of, particularly if they are still employed full-time.

Mr Jones said that multi-stage interviews may be unavoidable for some employers, making communication throughout the process even more critical to maintain good candidates’ interest in pursuing their application.

“Companies cannot forget that how interviewees are treated during this process can also impact the organisation’s reputation and even business opportunities,” the senior managing director said.

“Disengaged job applicants who have had a negative experience with a company are not only likely to withdraw their application, they could potentially speak negatively of the organisation at hand, jeopardising the attractiveness of the company as an employer of choice and even potential business.”

Linen and homewares retailer Sheridan faced that exact scenario last year, when a disgruntled candidate decried the “excessive” number of steps in its hiring process for a relatively junior position.

Full list of jobseeker pet peeves

Question: What are your biggest frustrations about the recruitment process when applying for a new role?

  • Slow feedback to get an update about where I stand in the recruitment process (53 per cent)
  • Delayed decision making (46 per cent)
  • Poor communication about the required steps in the recruitment process (44 per cent)
  • Doing multiple job interviews with the same employer (40 per cent)
  • Keeping track of multiple job interviews/opportunities with different employers (34 per cent)
  • Lack of transparency on rewards and benefits (27 per cent)
  • Difficulties scheduling interviews (25 per cent)
  • Changing role requirements (19 per cent)
  • Disappointment with contractual terms (17 per cent)

Source: Robert Half

Jobseekers reveal best ways to turn them off
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