Employers, workers at odds over training costs

Employers, workers at odds over training costs

‘You want it, you pay for it’ is what professionals are telling would-be employers, despite employers favouring candidates who take the personal initiative on upskilling.

While many employers feel that workers should be responsible for their own training and development, many professionals suggest they will boycott a business that does not offer formal training and development.

That is the finding of research by recruitment firm Hays, which determined 84 per cent of professional employees would overlook a job with no skills development opportunities, and 47 per cent would overlook a business entirely if it did not cater to their desire to upskill on-the-job.

Among the deal breakers for workers are not receiving time off to attend seminars, conferences or tertiary studies, and a lack of coaching or mentorships, according to Hays.

However, employers are far more enthused by workers who take on the responsibility for their own development, the research suggests.

Hays found that 77 per cent of employers are more likely to shortlist candidates who regularly upskill themselves, and more than half (59 per cent) said they actively encourage their workforce to “become self-directed learners”.

“There’s a push-pull between employers and employees when it comes to upskilling,” said Nick Deligiannis, Hays managing director for Australia and New Zealand.

“Today’s jobseekers are far more likely to judge a potential job role on how well it will position them for career longevity. Given how quickly technology changes, the challenge is to stay employable by keeping skills relevant. Employers that provide on-the-job training are therefore becoming very attractive to jobseekers.”

Mr Deligiannis added: “With highly-skilled professionals in demand, it could be that bosses who ensure their employees’ continuing learning will gain the upper hand in securing top talent.”

The results come from a survey that explored the views of 951 employers and 1,253 working professionals.

Employers, workers at odds over training costs
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